Connect with us

Hunza

Pakistan Army rescues stranded British mountaineers from Ultar Sar

Avatar

Published

on

Pakistan Army rescues Bruce Normand and Miller Timothy from Ultar Sar
ISPR

A team of highly skilled pilots of Pakistan Army has successfully rescued two British mountaineers from the Camp II of Ultar Sar in Hunza, Pakistan. Bruce Normand and Miller Timothy were on an expedition to summit the 7,338 meters high Ultar Sar along with Austrian Alpinist Christian Huber, the third member of the expedition.

They were hit by an avalanche in their sleep at Camp II of Ultar Sar at an altitude of 19,300 feet (5,883 meters). Christian Huber did not survive the avalanche. His body was recovered in the high-altitude operation by Pakistan Army and flown to Islamabad.

Bruce Normand and Miller Timothy

Bruce Normand and Miller Timothy

Bruce Normand and Miller Timothy received injuries in the avalanche but remained out of danger. However, due to bad weather, they were stuck with plentiful of supplies while a team of Pakistan Army pilots tried to rescue them safely.

According to Karrar Haidri, the secretary of Alpine Club of Pakistan, Austrian mountaineer Christian Huber was killed when an avalanche hit the climbers’ tent on Friday night during a strong storm at a height of 5,900 meters on Ultar Sar. He added that the expedition started in late May and they were permitted to climb until the first week of July.

Pakistan Army rescue operation on Ultar Sar in Hunza Valley

A Pakistan Army helicopter can be seen landed near Camp II on Ultar Sar during the operation.

Abdul Karim Zouqi, an employee of Higher Ground Expeditions, a Hunza valley based tour operating company that was managing the expedition, sent out the first rescue request on Saturday morning.

Due to bad weather, Pakistan Army helicopters could not reach the stranded mountaineers. A helicopter was finally able to get through at around 6:45 am on Sunday morning.

 

Austrian Alpinist Christian Huber

Photo of Austrian Alpinist Christian Huber

Major General Asif Ghafoor, the Director General of Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), had Tweeted photos of the rescue team along with the two mountaineers who survived the Ultar avalanche.

Christian Huber was the president of American Alpine Club.

Thomas Drew, Britain’s High Commissioner in Pakistan, sent a thank you message to Pakistan Army saying the mission had been “remarkable and dangerous”.

“Our gratitude to the Pakistan Army pilots who rescued two British climbers trapped by an avalanche on Ultar Sar Peak near Hunza. Our thoughts with their Austrian fellow climber who did not survive the avalanche.”

Ultar Sar is one of the most dangerous peaks to climb in Pakistan with high chances of avalanches. A similar avalanche had taken the life of Japanese climbers Tsuneo Hasegawa and Kiyotaka Hoshino. The both are laid to rest in Ultar Meadows. Nazir Sabir, Pakistan’s prominent mountaineer, had closely escaped the avalanche.

Chitral

7 Photo-stories on World Water Day 2020 from Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral (GBC)

Avatar

Published

on

AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
AKAH Pakistan

World Water Day is celebrated every year on 22nd March as an observance day to highlight the importance of freshwater. The day is used to advocate for the sustainable management of freshwater resources.

As part of the World Water Day 2020 celebrations, Aga Khan Agency for Habitat (AKAH) shares these stories of people from Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral whose lives have been deeply impacted by water and sanitation-related projects in the region.

AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
Over half of the people across Pakistan lack access to safe and clean water and have no choice but to consume water from whatever source exists in their villages, regardless of quality. Aga Khan Agency for Habitat, aiming to improve quality of life, is implementing water supply schemes across mountain communities in Pakistan.
AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
In mountainous parts of Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral, traditional wells are used as water reservoirs collecting the water coming from streams through canals. This water, coming directly from open sources, is unsafe as it is contaminated due to its exposure to both humans and animals. Without access to another source of water, people use this unsafe water for different purposes including drinking, cooking, and other domestic purposes.
AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
Clean drinking water has always been a huge problem for communities living in mountainous areas of Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral. Women and children are impacted the most as they must travel long distances to fetch water for cooking, washing, and laundry. AKAH’s work to connect each household to safe and clean with a water tap in their home enables women to keep their children safe from waterborne diseases, spend more quality time with their families, and also reduces time and labor lost to fetching water.
AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
Aga Khan Agency for Habitat (AKAH), with the help of communities, identifies water sources in the village, tests the water quality using its technical expertise, develops water infrastructure, constructs water reservoirs, and provides each family with a water tap in their home. More than 500,000 people across Pakistan now have access to safe drinking water in their homes, through AKAH’s efforts.
AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
Aga Khan Agency for Habitat’s WASEP model uses a community-based approach to help mountain communities get year-round all-season access to safe water. AKAH’s approach uses deep digging and other techniques to ensure that water does not freeze in the pipes despite the fact that these villages are covered in snow for more than five months of the year.
AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
“I enjoy taking freshwater from this tap in my home; you would say I am in love with it that’s why I stand here many times a day”.
AKAH Pakistan World Water Day 2020 Stories
Aga Khan Agency for Habitat, with its mandate to improve quality of life, is helping women and young girls across Pakistan enjoy a healthy life, by providing access to safe water in their homes, reducing their exposure to water-borne diseases, allowing them to spend more quality time with families.
Continue Reading

Crime

Hunza Police Raids and Seizes 230 liters of Araq, arrests illegal Hunza Moonshine maker

Avatar

Published

on

Hunza Police Raids and Seizes 230 liters of Araq Moonshine - Hunza Water
SHO Hunza (Facebook)

Hunza Police had raided an illegal Hunza moonshine distillery in Altit town of Central Hunza Valley and seized around 230 liters of Araq. According to a post published on Facebook by an account associated with SHO Hunza District, the police raided the illegal moonshine factory based on a tip.

The successful operation was led by SHO Hunza himself. A team of policemen who participated in the raid posed for a photo with an illegal moonshine maker after seizing Araq and distillation equipment.

The post further mentions that an FIR has been lodged against the owner of the factory. The distillation equipment and 230 liters of Araq, some of which were already filled in reused mineral water bottles, were seized from the illegal moonshine factory.

Hunza Police Raids and Seizes 230 liters of Araq Moonshine - Hunza Water
Araq (Hunza Moonshine) filled in reused mineral water bottles seized by Hunza Police.

Raids of such kind are not new in the Hunza district. Despite a rise in making and selling of the Hunza Moonshine, locally known as Araq and sometimes referred to as Hunza Water by tourists, authorities have failed to formulate address the issue.

During the past five years, at least seven such raids have been made but the real issue is far from being addressed.

Hunza Police Raids and Seizes 230 liters of Araq Moonshine - Hunza Water
Illegal Hunza moonshine distillation equipment seized by Hunza Police.

According to a survey in 2015 by a youth organization, 3 out of every 5 men in Hunza consume Araq at least once in a month. Due to a ban on publicly buying and selling of alcohol, the illegal moonshine makers find a way to fill the gap.

In Gilgit-Baltistan, the local moonshine making industry is thriving in the districts of Hunza and Ghizer.

BBC reported in 2013 that despite a public ban, alcoholism is becoming a rising issue in Pakistan. Despite excise taxation on liquor, beer, spirits and alcohol, there is no written national policy in Pakistan adopted to address the many issues related to alcoholism.

Continue Reading

Download PSL T20 App

Advertisement

Like us on Facebook

Advertisement

Trending