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Man in Gilgit Returns 1 Million Lost Money to the Owner

Abdul Hameed Khan, a resident of a small town in Yasin Valley finds 1 million rupees on a street in Gilgit and returns it to the owner setting an example of honesty.

Imran Ahmed Hunzai

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1 million Lost Money Returned

Easy money is everybody’s dream . From jackpots to lotteries to money making schemes that would make you a millionaire overnight, every one dreams about getting stacks of cash so that they are able to spend some quality time without the effort to make money – in a legal yet slower way.

But this one man in Gilgit has different plans with his life.

One evening, Fazal Rehman, an employee of NATCO, lost 1 million rupees in some street in Gilgit city. He might have lost all hopes to get the money back but he didn’t know an angel was out there to become his savior.

Abdul Hameed Khan, a resident of a small town in Yasin Valley finds the money and believe it or not, he returns the amount to the owner who was still in search of his lost money.

Hameed could have easily fled with the money but he would rather return it back the rightful owner. The news went viral on social media with people praising Hameed’s honesty. The following post was made by Pamir Times.

This is not the first time such an account of honesty is shown by a citizen in Gilgit. A few years back, Essa Khan, an employee of Serena Hotel in Gilgit, returned $50,000 to a guest who had lost the money. Later that day, news agencies like Telegraph and BBC covered his story.

“A hotel cleaner who earns just £200 a year has been hailed a national hero in Pakistan after he returned $50,000 in cash left behind by an absent-minded guest.” – Telegraph

All hail the mountains and people of Gilgit-Baltistan!

Imran Hunzai is a Digital Media Consultant and activist based in Islamabad, Pakistan. When free, he likes to travel, do photography and play Rabab. He also runs a HONY inspired blog called Humans of Hunza. Follow him of Twitter @ihunzai.

Education

Sonaina Hamiya: Working on Preservation of Burushaski Lanuguage

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Sonaina Hamiya - Working on Preservation of Burushaski Lanuguage

My name is Sonaina and I’m from Aliabad, Hunza. I’ve recently graduated from National College of Arts (NCA), Lahore.

Being a Hunza girl, it came to my realization that Burushaski language is being forgotten and young Burusho, especially those who live in the cities, have adopted other languages as the primary means of communication. These days, the influence of other languages on Burushaski is just tremendous.

To make my contribution to on-going efforts of preserving Burushaski, I did my thesis on “The Preservation of Burushaski language“. This project is a vehicle for expressing my ideas that language is the foremost pillar of society to communicate and a creative structural solution can be provided for its preservation.

My motivation to try preserving my own language in a visual form relates to the fact that many people have been fascinated about Burushaski and researchers have found it to be one of the very few isolated languages. Burushaski has still no standard writing system. There isn’t a lot of written literary work but a number of oral traditions have been collected. Burushaski continues to be a language of self-identification among its speakers and despite many efforts, this fascinating language is endangered.

My aim through this project is to preserve Burushaski language through visual means and to ignite the revival of the language in the daily lives of young Burusho living in and outside Hunza.

This story is part of the #GBCProspers campaign by GBee. Send your stories at editor[at]gbee.pk or inbox your story at our Facebook page.

Join GBee to participate in our community forums and discuss topics about Gilgit, Baltistan, Chitral, Kohistan and Kashmir.

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Astore

Introducing #GBCProspers – Stories from Gilgit, Baltistan and Chitral

Imran Ahmed Hunzai

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Introducing #GBCProspers - Stories from Gilgit, Baltistan and Chitral

Every day when we wake up, we struggle hard to make a name for ourselves, our families and our country. We see a handful of names in the limelight while hundreds and thousands of names remain in an obscurity no matter how big or small that person’s contribution to the society is.

At GBee, we believe that a society cannot prosper without the small yet meaningful contributions of its members.

This is why, we are announcing the launch of an on-going campaign which we are now officially calling #GBCProspers. This campaign aims to celebrate the contributions, small and big, by the common citizens that collectively reflect in the social, cultural, religious, musical and economic prosperity of the mountain communities.

How to access the stories?

The stories published under #GBCProspers campaign can be found on a dedicated topic section. Each story will also be published in its relevant district page on Facebook and GBee’s Instagram and Twitter accounts.

Alternatively, you can search for the hashtag #GBCProspers on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get the latest as well as the stories published in the past.

How to submit a story?

Stories can be submitted at our email editor[at]gbee.pk with #GBCProspers in the subject, on our WhatsApp number +923555075849 or directly at your relevant district page on Facebook.

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Blogs

Pakistani Filmmaker Fahad Kahut uses Gilgiti Cap to depict terrorists of APS Peshawar Attack

Imran Ahmed Hunzai

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Fahad Kahut Gilgit-Cap APS Peshawar Attack Terrorists
YouTube

Pakistani filmmaker Fahad Kahut has used a Chilasi version of Gilgiti Cap to depict terrorists of Army Public School  (APS) Peshawar Attack in his new short film released on Youtube.

There has been a backlash on social media by activists from Gilgit-Baltistan against the filmmaker for using the Gilgit traditional cap to depict the terrorists involved in the 2014 Peshawar school massacre.

Fahad Kahut APS Peshwar Attack Short-film
A screen grab from Fahad Kahut’s short film on APS Peshwar Attack. A terrorist holding a gun has is shown wearing a Gilgiti Cap.

The director, producer and writer, who describes himself to be “focused on creating narrative films ” has primarily worked on Kashmir issue and published various pro-army publications including an article titled “General Raheel Sharif – A Man living up to the vision of Allama Iqbal”.

“I was also surprised to see this cap. One must take into consideration while using a cultural symbol of any people. The filmmakers have no right to use our caps as something a symbol of terrorism. Shame” said a Twitter user Noor Akbar.

Also read: Three policemen martyred, two terrorists killed in attack on Kargah Nullah check post in Gilgit

“What is your motive behind showing this cultural cap as a symbol of terror – there can be lot of other ways to depict a terrorist why you choose this cap which can not be easily found in any market in down countries except in Gilgit?Shame on everyone who contributed in this video and those who did not censor it. People like you are born to divide the country by showing intolerance and disrespect towards other cultures. Shame on you for using the cultural cap of Gilgit-Baltistan!” adds a Youtube user while commenting under the short film.

However, there are some who think this could have been a mistake. 

Facebook user Shahid Khan comments that maybe the filmmaker wanted to use the famous Pakol or Peshawari hat which has been associated with the Taliban for so many decades.

At the same time, as correctly pointed out by a Youtube user, the Gilgiti Cap, specifically the Chilasi (Diamer) version is very hard to find in the market.

Only the people behind the short film can tell what exactly went behind using the specific cap to depict the terrorists.

Kahut’s short-film Faryad had won IndieFEST Film Awards for short movie on Kashmir in 2016.

Update:

Fahad Kahut has spoken and says it was “merely out of sheer ignorance”.

“have apologized in past and I apologize again, this was merely out sheer ignorance and my lack of understanding of cultural norms back then. I am a huge admirer of GB people and can never imagine to disrespect them. I hope my apologies are accepted.” he commented on Twitter.

Note: The wood color Gilgit cap is not only used in Diamer but also in the districts of Astore, Gilgit, Ghizer and even Kohistan. A black color version of the traditional cap is widely used in Diamer.

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